How to get into the city’s ‘pixy tenement’ by the lake

The water is blue and blue skies are rolling, the weather is perfect.

The sky is blue too.

But that’s the perfect weather for a party in the basement of a tenement building on the edge of Manhattan.

“I’m sitting here drinking a Coke,” says 20-year-old Jessica Pritchard.

She is a member of the Pixies Tenement Club, a group of women who are also living there, and she is having a birthday party.

Pritchers life is different from most people’s.

She doesn’t have a job, so she’s working as a server at a restaurant called Jules, where she earns $7 an hour.

She’s been living in the building for about a year.

She says she can’t get over the fact that she’s not able to go out and have fun.

“It’s a very lonely place,” she says.

Prieson’s family moved to Manhattan from Michigan a decade ago, and her parents are still there.

“They’re so supportive and so happy, but they also want to know how it is for me and my friends,” she said.

She said she is happy to share her life.

“We’re not looking for anyone to be in the club,” Priesons mom, Angela Priesson, told the New York Daily News.

“There are a lot of different things that happen in the tenement, and the only thing we can really control is our own happiness.”

Prieses father, Chris Pries, also lives in the same building, and he and his wife are regulars.

“She’s a pretty independent person,” he said.

“That’s a good thing.”

Pritches life is very different from many people’s lives.

She isn’t a server, and that’s a huge difference from the typical tenement life.

She lives with her parents in a single-family house in Brooklyn.

Her parents also live in the house.

“When she’s out of the house, she’s very independent,” Chris Prithes said.

He said Priess family had been in the Tenement for years, but had recently moved out.

“Our life in the 10ement is very, very different,” Chris said.

The Pixies, like the rest of the tenements residents, live on the streets of Manhattan, in a very isolated building with no neighbors.

“You can’t really be anywhere, you can’t have any interaction with anyone, you don’t know anyone,” Prits said.

Pushes and shoves can happen in a lot more places, and it’s not uncommon for people to be kicked out of a bar or even kicked out at a party.

The building is so far from any other building that Pries said she would be “pretty uncomfortable” in the bathroom.

“The bathroom has been in there since the time we moved in,” Prisons mother said.

But she says the Pixys are very happy.

“If I was to tell you that the tenant’s living situation is not good, you know what I’m saying?” she said, laughing.

“This building has really been a sanctuary for me.”

Prysons father, who is also a member, said he thinks it’s a really special place.

“For me, the Pixy Tenement is the only place where I feel like I’m not alone.

I don’t feel alone, I feel safe,” he told the Daily News, adding that he doesn’t see any other place in the city where that is the case.

The party Pries is hosting is not an official Pixies event.

But Pries says she plans to do it anyway, so the Pixers friends can get together and make some friends.

Prys was living with her mother when she moved in.

She has never met her mother before.

Her mother, Angela, who lives in a different building, said that her daughter is a “good person.”

“We are like a good family,” Angela said.

In fact, Prys says she is “very lucky.”

“The Pixies are like my family,” she told the newspaper.

“Everyone is very nice and very loving, and I don´t have any problems at all.”

Prys said she hopes to get to know her mother and see if they have any special connections to the building.

“My mum has been very helpful to me,” Prys said.